On-Demand LA CES™ Education Sessions

We are pleased to bring you these virtual learning opportunities in an on-demand format so you may join when it is most convenient for you. Most on-demand sessions are recorded from an originally live presentation.

 

WATER MANAGEMENT IN A CHANGING CLIMATE: INFRASTRUCTURE

Credits: 1.0 PDH-HSW
Instructor: Shawn T. Kelly, PLA, FASLA

 
The session prior was focused on aquifers and the current and escalating condition of water insecurity. Given that as a beginning, this session will address one of the base principles of design: all design is dealing with opportunities and constraints. In regards to stormwater management as Landscape Architects we must consider how to turn the constraint of accelerating stormwater challenges into opportunities in design. This presentation is a distilled version on the stormwater course I teach at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and as such, will connect some elements quickly which deserve greater time in class.
In city evolution we are seeing a “densification” in population. This is a trend identified by the UN at Habitat Three. We often speak of sustainable development. How can this apply to cities? Concentrations of humans in a small space equals accelerated use of the resources. In Ecology we learn the term “carrying capacity.” Cities have exceeded their carrying capacities by far. We hear about “food deserts” in cities. We must also consider where the water is coming from. These issues must be accounted for by city design. Infrastructure must include water and food production for a truly sustainable city design.
We will talk about the dual components of stormwater: quantity and quality. The quantity is quantifiable with some ease, while the quality is very specific to site considerations. The Rational Runoff formula is the basis for stormwater modeling. We will reconnect with that simple formula with new perspective in light of a changing climate. This will give a quick oversight into the quantity portion of the equation noted above. Again, we must remember that the rate of stormwater increase is logarithmic, and that, alone should give pause to anyone dealing with stormwater management.
Next we will examine the quality issue of stormwater. We will discuss sediment sequestration and why it is critical to any project, any scale, and any site. Next we will look (briefly) at acid rain (it is ubiquitous and never went away), and the implications that presents to our aquifers and aquacludes. We will note agricultural runoff and site specific responses via bio-activated swales, etc, to deal with some pollutants. We will also discuss the common sources of failure to planted depressions often called rain gardens. We will quickly discuss phyto-remediation techniques in the landscape, including floating islands.
We will briefly talk about the necessary consideration of alternate use of gray water for uses that are now being served by potable water. This will quickly cover flushing toilets, cooling building mechanicals, and geothermal considerations. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live Oct. 21, 2022 webinar.

Learning objectives:
1. Better understand the quote from G. Box, “All models are wrong. Some are useful.”
2. You must consider the assumptions made in any modeling strategy, and account for the potential critical issues that those assumptions affect. In regard to stormwater, these can be disastrous.
3. Sequential treatment of both quantity and quality of stormwater runoff must be considered in any design.
4. A reminder that you, as a Landscape Architect, by the LAAB guidelines for accredited programs in the Profession, have more education in stormwater than Civil Engineers. There are also questions on the LARE about stormwater, which do not occur on the Civil Engineer’s licensing examinations. You are responsible for the health, safety, and welfare of your clients, and those who will be impacted by your work on any site.

 

ACTIVATED + INCLUSIVE: DYNAMIC MIXED-USE ENVIRONMENTS

Credits: 1.0 PDH
Speakers: Lisl Kotheimer | Associate, Landscape Architect @MKSK
Jeffrey Pongonis | Principal, Landscape Architect @MKSK

 
Today, communities are striving for enriching and authentic experiences. Across all geographies and demographics, the desire for shared community space and a magnetic center that supports daily life is in full swing.
MKSK has been involved in the evolution of two signature districts — Easton in Columbus, Ohio and Van Aken in Cleveland, OH. Both projects exemplify an earnest ambition to realize our shared cultural goals of diversity, equity, and inclusion in everyday life by tapping into local culture and expression. This was a goal of the planning and design process of both districts.
With real-world project and program examples focused on aspirational retail entrepreneurship and curated local art, we’ll demonstrate how new mixed-use environments can celebrate authenticity, utilize local fabricators and artists, and foster diverse entrepreneurship to activate place and embed local pride and connection into a community-centered space. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live June 28, 2022 webinar.

Learning objectives:
1. Understand how landscape architects are uniquely positioned to bring together a diverse team of artists, makers, and entrepreneurs to create authentic community spaces.
2. Learn about community-centered approaches to designing mixed-use districts. (not your typical community engagement sessions)
3. Understand how activations are a tool that landscape architects can use to create enduring public spaces that are inclusive and evolve with the community.

 

The Cultural Landscape Foundation’s

RACE & SPACE CONVERSATIONS, PART II

Credits: 1.5 PDH
Moderator: April De Simone | Principal, Trahan Architects

 
How do we create a spatial practice for a more equitable and just society? In this Race & Space Conversation, moderator and transdisciplinary designer April De Simone, principal at Trahan Architects, will speak with panelists including Director of Water’s Edge Museum Candance Henry of Oxford, MD, Judge Gary Jackson of Lincoln Hills, CO, and, Bronze Foundation President Darwin Dean of Minneapolis, MN, to engage with this question and explore case studies of two sites featured in the Landslide 2021: Race and Space report (Water’s Edge and Wink’s Panorama) along with a site recently enrolled in Landslide (Hiawatha Golf Club). Urbanist and kin-keeper Angela Kyle and National Building Museum Vice President Jacquelyn Sawyer will join the conversation to investigate how our surroundings construct and convey identity and culture and the systems that uplift or erase that constructed experience.

For generations, our cultural landscapes have served as the setting for the origins, arrival, movement, and settlement of people in this country and the brutal consequences of the baseless assertion that one race is more entitled to space than others. Now, we find ourselves in a pivotal moment of reckoning with spatial inequities and reimagining our built and natural environment. This conversation will dig deep into these three Landslide sites to explore topics – or throughlines – that include spatial nostalgia, erasure, and the need to amplify community voices in the design process and redefine the concept of “integrity” in historic preservation work. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live June 17, 2022 webinar.

 

WATER MANAGEMENT IN A CHANGING CLIMATE: INSECURITY

Credits: 1.0 PDH-HSW
Instructor: Shawn T. Kelly, PLA, FASLA

 
The world is running out of potable water. Our planet is faced with unprecedented changes that are drastically affecting our potable water supplies while inundating the surface of the earth with severe runoff, flooding, and damage from storm events.
We will examine the three stormwater cycle diagrams that describe the water cycle. The first diagram illustrates the least impacted natural cycle of rainfall and recharge. The second diagram shows the acceleration and changes to the water cycle from typical human occupation and the built environment. The final diagram examines the middle diagram with the impacts of greater stormwater episodes, occurring with greater frequency, and disastrous results.
The discussion will then proceed into small and large aquifers and the impacts of the altered water cycle on our available potable water supplies. The Oglala aquifer is going dry and the implications of that event will be discussed through different lenses. First the GNP and food “security” will be noted, followed by the reality of climate refugees in America, and some hints of what that portends. Then we will note some small aquifer implications I face in my practice in Wisconsin. The lack of information will also be a topic to cover briefly.
General discussion about the opportunities for water harvesting and reuse on any given project will provide opportunities for later discussion.
The model for any concept is flawed. You, as designer and operator of the modeling system must always ask what assumptions were made in producing the model of choice. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live May 12, 2022 webinar.

Learning objectives:
1. Our aquifers are the source of potable water, and these are all in a challenged state by the effects of a changing climate.
2. This issue is not political.
3. The practical solution to water insecurity includes harvesting and improving stormwater quality to accommodate alternate uses.
4. We have climate refugees in America now. This issue is not going away.
5. Our profession is at a critical point for making a significant improvement in our prospects for survival on this planet.
6. Question the assumptions of any modeling system.

 

The Cultural Landscape Foundation’s

RACE & SPACE CONVERSATIONS, PART I

Credits: 1.5 PDH
Moderator: April De Simone | Principal, Trahan Architects

 
How do we create a spatial practice for a more equitable and just society? In this Race & Space Conversation, moderator and transdisciplinary designer April De Simone, principal at Trahan Architects, and a panel of historians, kin-keepers, activists, landscape architects, designers, and thought leaders will engage with this question to investigate how our surroundings construct and convey identity and culture and the systems that uplift or erase that constructed experience.

For generations, our cultural landscapes have served as the setting for the origins, arrival, movement, and settlement of people in this country and the brutal consequences of the baseless assertion that one race is more entitled to space than others. Now, we find ourselves in a pivotal moment of reckoning with, redefining, and reimagining the social and spatial inequities of our built and natural environment. This inaugural conversation will dig deep into three sites featured in TCLF’s Landslide 2021: Race and Space program to explore topics – or throughlines– that include spatial nostalgia, erasure, and the need to amplify community voices in the design process and redefine the concept of “integrity” in historic preservation work.

Panelists include historian and author Linda Tarrant-Reid of New Rochelle, N.Y.; Partners for Environmental Justice board member Amin Davis of Raleigh, N.C.; and urbanist and kin-keeper Angela Kyle of Pensacola, FL. Each will provide a case study of a site featured in Landslide 2021: Race and Space and engage with landscape architects Walter Hood, creative director of Hood Design Studio and professor of landscape architecture & environmental planning and urban design at U.C. Berkeley, and Kofi Boone, Joseph D. Moore Distinguished Professor of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning at North Carolina State University, in a thought-provoking, wide-ranging conversation moderated by Ms. De Simone. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live April 6, 2022 webinar.

 

OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! (non-design roles in landscape architecture)

Credits: 2.0 PDH
Panelists:
Annette Wilkus, FASLA, RLA, LEED AP | Founding Partner | SiteWorks Landscape Architecture
Dana Worthington, PLA | President | RHWE
Erin A. Degutis, RLA, AICP CEP | Energy Utility Industry | Charlotte NC – Denver CO
Eugenia M. Martin, FASLA | ASLA President | Sr. Project Manager – WMC Team, The Ohio State University
Kathleen M. Duncan | Principal Show Design & Production Manager
Kara D. Tavella | Associate Director of Administration | Yale University Facilities

 
This panel of women will share the decisions and opportunities of their career path development, moderated by Kara Tavella. While most are licensed Landscape Architects, many have not established a typical Landscape Architect job description. Through this course, they will share their service and commitment to facilitate impactful change with the work they do and their experiences working with community institutions and nonprofit organizations. Please join us in this discussion where our panelists will discuss their roles outside of design, the importance of mentorship and spotting opportunities. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live March 29, 2022 webinar.

Learning Objectives:
1. Landscape architecture is more than design
2. The importance of finding mentors, listening and execution
3. Be willing to think outside the box either when times get tough or opportunity knocks

 

PED 101 – INTEGRATING PEDESTRIAN SAFETY AND COMFORT INTO EVERY STREETSCAPE

Credits: 1.0 PDH-HSW
Instructor: Wendy Landman, Senior Policy Advisor, WalkBoston

 
Walkability is today’s byword for street design in urban, suburban and rural settings. WalkBoston helps make that happen across Massachusetts. We are a pedestrian advocacy non-profit working with community residents, local organizations, municipal and state staff, and consulting design teams to ensure that walking safety and comfort are truly built into their projects. Ped 101 is our tried and tested tool to engage and educate people about what goes into the design of walkable places. You will never walk around again without noticing how traffic signals, walking surfaces, curb cuts and street furnishings affect your walking experience. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live December 9, 2021 webinar.

Learning objectives:
1. Understand the critical role of street design in creating streets that are safe for people who are walking.
2. Understand how street furnishings like benches, trees and wayfinding can allow people to stay physically active as they age in their communities.
3. Learn about the critical role that vehicle speed plays in urban, suburban and rural walkability.

 

THE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

Credits: 1.5 PDH-HSW
Instructors: Ernest C. Wong, PLA, FASLA, APA – Founder and Principal, site
Sean O’Malley, RLA – Managing Principal, SWA Laguna Beach
Lovisa Kjerrgren – Associate, SWA Laguna Beach

 
As Landscape Architects, the work that we engage in is important. The ability to shape and enhance the public realm and community institutions affords landscape architects a unique ability to improve quality of life for often underserved communities. We design public spaces, private spaces, places for playing, places for healing, spaces that capture the essence of who we are as human beings.
While numerous Landscape Architects have and continue to serve on public and governmental committees and commissions, it is the exposure to the general public that enhances our status as professionals. So above serving ourselves and our profession, we need to look beyond the small microcosm of our design world. We need to position ourselves to serve in the public realm, where our voices can be heard and our decisions can impact communities beyond just design.
Through this course, Ernie Wong, Sean O’Malley and Lovisa Kjerrgren will share example from their experiences working with community institutions, nonprofit organizations and their service and commitment to facilitate impactful change with the work they do. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live October 28, 2021 webinar.

Learning objectives:
1. Participants will learn about the importance of partnering with non-profit and community-based organizations, and how landscape architects are uniquely positioned to connect such entities.
2. Learn what social responsibility means for Landscape Architects.
3. Learn how you can get involved in service work in our profession.
4. Participants will learn about several tangible examples of community improvement ranging from a larger community or city scale to more site-specific projects.

 

WORKING WITH UNDERSERVED COMMUNITIES

Credits: 1.0 PDH-HSW
Instructor: Dennis R. Nola, PLA, ASLA | Chair, Landscape Architecture Undergraduate Program at UMD

 
This lecture will focus on engaging underserved communities, sharing best practices, and my experiences serving since 2008 as President of the Board of Directors for Central Kenilworth Avenue Revitalization, CDC in Riverdale, Maryland.

Attention will be focused on how to get started, pitfalls to be avoided, and how to develop the infrastructure, support, funding, relationships, and trust necessary for success. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live September 30, 2021 webinar.

Learning Objectives:
1. Learn how to approach underserved communities, find partners, get to know the community, and develop framework infrastructure.
2. Understand the importance of community engagement, surveys, and developing a conceptual master plan that identifies potential projects.
3. Learn how to pursue funding, determine when is the right time to form a not for profit community development corporation, and how to involve local legislators.

 

THE LANDSCAPE OF DESIGN PRACTICE IN A REMOTE CONDITION

Credits: 1.5 PDH
Instructors: Kona A. Gray | FASLA, PLA – EDSA, Principal
Daniel Vasini | WEST 8 NY, Creative Director

 
Through the pandemic we have all had opportunity to explore new paradigms, many in regard to business methods. This presentation explores the benefits and challenges we are now faced as designers working in a remote condition. We will discuss strategies for maintaining creativity and effectively collaborating with clients and colleagues on design. Join us as we discuss remote team management and strategies to maintain connection. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live June 15, 2021 webinar.

Learning Objectives:
1. Creative Design Process During the Pandemic
2. Methods of Remote Collaboration
3. Remote Team Management & Strategies

 

EXPANDING ELASTICITY IN THE LANDSCAPE

Credits: 1 PDH-HSW
Instructor: Greg Miller, Principal Landscape Architect – MRWM Landscape Architects

 
A lot has changed over the past year and public landscapes are increasingly recognized for their role in ecological resilience, social justice, mental well-being, physical health, and economic stability. Designing spaces that grow and adapt is a hallmark of landscape architecture, but designing them to be truly elastic is what makes them timeless.

This presentation investigates the benefits of elasticity and plasticity in natural systems and explores ways to apply these lessons to the built environment. These strategies reinforce and amplify the effectiveness of landscapes in creating stronger and healthier communities. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live April 15, 2021 webinar.

Learning Objectives:
1. Gain an understanding of how elasticity and plasticity creates resilient natural systems.
2. Learn how to apply these principles to landscapes in the built environment.
3. Explore the possibilities of incorporating increasing elasticity to the profession of landscape architecture.

 

OUR JOURNEY THROUGH LEADERSHIP IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Part II: Mentorship and Sponsorship

Credits: 1.5 PDH
Panelists: Rebecca Leonard, Chris Reed, TJ Marston, Samantha Solano

 
We are excited to collaborate with WxLA and once again bring together leaders in the landscape architect field to discuss important issues in part II of Victor Stanley’s series, Our Journey through Leadership in Landscape Architecture. Please join us in this discussion where our panelist will delve into a deeper discussion on mentorship, sponsorship and seeking new leadership opportunities and last but not least navigating the COVID environment. We hope this panel will be inspiring, educational and offer tools to further advance women in landscape architecture. Register above for on-demand viewing of the live March 25, 2021 webinar.

Learning Objectives:
Understand as landscape professional how to step into more leadership roles as a woman | How to identify formal/informal mentors as well as sponsors | How do we advocate for stronger female leaders in our profession | How do we best navigate the new environment of COVID and what the future of the profession will look like? | How to best work through disorienting dilemmas that we may encounter?

 

 

The logo and word marks “LA CES” and “Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System” are a collaboration of the American Society of Landscape Architects, Canadian Society of Landscape Architects, Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture, Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards, Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board, and the Landscape Architecture Foundation.

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